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Bob Dempster

Seattle World Cruiser

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Renton, WA 98057

 

9401-9947 Airport Way S
Seattle, WA, 98108
United States

July 3rd

July 3rd

Daily Flight Information:
Departed:
Ambala, India
Arrived: Multan, India
Miles Flown: 360
Flight Time: 5 hrs. 45 mins.
(9:20 a.m. to 2:05 p.m.)

Total Miles Flown:12,475
Total Flight Time:167 hrs. 40 min



Flight Continues to Multan, India

Daily Report

by Lt. L. P. Arnold, "Chicago", Mechanic

Left for Multan at 9:00 along edge of Sind Desert -- big sand storm for major part of the way reducing visibility to minimum. We followed a railroad track most of the way and had to fly low in order to see it -- and here the heat was terrific, like the blast from a furnace.

The field at Multan is the parade ground of a big cantonment. The field was entirely surrounded by a line of troops & the Commanding Officer, Col. Butler, and other officers met us as we climbed out. We all fueled at once and then went to quarters for a bath and a nap. In the evening some of us accepted the Colonel's invitation and dined at the regimental mess -- with its ceremony and all I think we'll remember it a long time.

Multan is reputed to be the hottest place in India -- and we all believe it. During the day the temp was 116 and at night 98 with no breeze -- but being so tired we slept just the same.


Daily Report

by Lt. L. H. Smith, Commanding

At 9:20 a.m. this morning, the flight departed for Multan, flying over the edge of the Sind Desert. A few showers of rain were encountered at the start of the flight; later running into a very heavy dust storm. An attempt was made to get above this, but after reaching an altitude of approximately 5,000 feet, it was realized this was useless. It became necessary to fly just above the ground because the visibility had decreased to such an extent that it was similar to flying through a fog. The heat here was intense and again proved the advisability of putting on the larger radiators in Tokyo for tropical work.

The flight arrived at Multan at 2:05 and landed on the parade ground of the British Cantonment, the British here taking great precautions to keep the field clear and established a guard. When the landing was made, the field was entirely surrounded by a line of troops to prevent the natives from crossing. The officers of the post welcomed the fliers and furnished all possible assistance. For the night, the personnel were divided up among several officers, staying at their homes.

Multan is the hottest station so far reached, the temperature being 116° in the shade when the planes landed and remained nearly the same throughout the night. This made it very difficult for the personnel to obtain any rest. Its effects began to show on each of them.

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